Dr Mandana Seyfeddinipur

Linguist | Educator | Director / Endangered Languages Archive

Dr Mandana Seyfeddinipur is a linguist and educator. She studied at Free University of Berlin, then did her PhD at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands and her Marie Curie postdoctoral work at Stanford University in the US. Since 2010 she directs the Endangered Languages Documentation Programme funded by Arcadia, which supports the documentation of endangered languages across the globe through funding, training and advocacy. In 2014, she also took over the  the Endangered Languages Archive where now over 500 multimedia collections of endangered languages are preserved and made accessible free of charge globally.

Programm

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Case Study: Kusunda - The Art of Using Interactive VR to Engage the Audience

Gayatri Parameswaran, Co-Founder, NowHere Media, Germany I Dr. Mandana Seyfeddinipur, Director, Endangered Languages Documentation Programme & Endangered Languages Archive, Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Germany

What makes a language fall asleep? What does it take to awaken one? Kusunda is a voice-driven virtual reality experience about revitalising a dormant indigenous language in Nepal. Creators at NowHere Media -- a leading immersive studio for impact driven storytelling -- embarked on a long co-creative journey with members of the Kusunda community to produce the VR experience, which recently won the Grand Jury Storyscapes Award at the Tribeca Film Festival. [...]

 

 

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What IS the Art of Science Communication?

Prof Dr Antje Boetius, Director of the Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz Center of Marine and Polar Research, Germany I Milica Momčilović, President of the World Federation of Science Journalists, Serbia I Francesca Panetta, Immersive artist and journalist, UK I Dr Mandana Seyfeddinipur, Director of the Endangered Languages Documentation Programme & Endangered Languages Archive, Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Germany

More interactive stuff, more immersive experiences, more classical formats, a mixture? Or something completely new? Bridging the gap between science and science journalism or rather keep everyone’s own perspective? Why is it sometimes so hard to reach people? And what are the most promising solutions? Let’s discuss the art of science communication and science journalism with renowned experts from the field!